Archive for the ‘Holiday Ideas’ Category

Log Cabins: Perfect for an Adventure Break

Saturday, November 15th, 2014
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The crisp climate of autumn is one of the best times of year to take an adventure break in the UK, and where better to get outdoors than by booking a holiday in a log cabin! Our lodges and log cabins are ideal for those looking for some adventure during the autumn, so we’ve come up with just a few suggestions on the perfect lodges for your next adventure holiday.

Lodge on the Lake, Lake District

Log cabin in Lake District

Lodge on the Lake, Lake District, Ref. 31127

Lodge on the Lake is a stunning property in a quiet holiday park on the shores of Windermere. Sleeping 6, this luxury log cabin offers unrivalled views across the lake, which you can take advantage of from many of the rooms and also the spectacular deck to the front and side of the cabin. At Lodge on the Lake, you can enjoy many activities just a stone’s throw from your log cabin! The decking offers access to your own private beach area, where guests can enjoy swimming and fishing. More active guests can also use the holiday park’s facilities to explore Windermere by boat or try their hand at water-skiing or kayaking. Of course, if you travel outside the holiday park, the spectacular landscape of the Lake District is also on your doorstep, with endless opportunities for walking, cycling and hiking.

The Beeches, Pembrokeshire

Log cabin in Pembrokeshire

The Beeches, Pembrokeshire, Ref. 23608

The Beeches is a 5 star log cabin nestled among 30 acres of ancient woodland near Narbeth, with plenty of scope for an unforgettable adventure break. From here, you’ll have access to Pembrokeshire’s beautiful coastline with mile after mile of quiet sandy beaches to explore and you’ll also be able to walk as much of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Path as you please! The Beeches offers the perfect base for an active holiday with cosy, comfortable accommodation sleeping 4, WiFi to keep in touch with the outside world and plan the next day’s adventures, and an outdoor Jacuzzi to relax in.

No. 4 Elm Drive, Lincolnshire

Log cabin in Lincolnshire

No. 4 Elm Drive, Lincolnshire, Ref. 916145

Set within the tranquil Tattershall Lakes County Park, No. 4 Elm Drive is surrounded by 365 acres of woodland and lakes. The accommodation is bright and airy with patio doors leading to a decked veranda overlooking one of the many lakes in the park. After a day of adventurous activities, guests will also find a bubbling hot tub waiting for them on the veranda, where they can relax and soak their tired muscles! The many facilities in the park include a gym, swimming pool and spa, whilst also offering visitors the opportunity to try watersports such as jet-skiing in the dedicated 45 acre jet-skiing lake and wakeboarding in the park’s 60 acre water-skiing and wakeboarding lake.

Here at Sykes, we have a fantastic range of cottages for walking holidays and cottages suitable for cycling holidays so if you’re interested in learning more then please contact our dedicated reservations team on 01244 356 695. You can also see our full range of lodges and log cabins by visiting our website.

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Louise O'Toole

By Louise O'Toole

Louise loves reading, shopping, baking and cosy country pubs with log fires. A nice cup of tea will never be turned down. She has spent many childhood summers on the beach in Cornwall and walking the hills of the Lake District.

Holiday Properties With Delightful Views

Thursday, November 13th, 2014
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One of the best parts of holidaying in the UK or Ireland is the beautiful views that are visible from your doorstep. Whether you’re staying along the coast or in the countryside, you’ll never be far from a delightful view. What’s better, though, is having a wonderful view from your holiday home’s living room, bedroom or even bathroom! If this is your idea of a perfect property perk then you’re in the right place, as we have a stack of properties that benefit from stunning views without needing to head outside. Read on for ten fine examples of the properties that have stunning views right from the bedside.

Wisteria Cottage, Devon

Reference 905075

Property reference 905075

Take in some of the delightful Devon scenery without even leaving your conservatory in the lovely Wisteria Cottage.

Porth House, Wales

Reference 761

Property reference 761

Its position overlooking Porth Diana beach on Trearddur Bay makes this stunning, architect-designed property as stunning to look out of as it is to look into.

Blue Barn Cottage, Wales

Property reference 22797

Property reference 22797

The delightful, far reaching views from the bedroom in this lovely property are a wonder to wake up to.

Old Rectory Cottage, Wales

Reference 903548

Property reference 903548

This upside-down property was designed so guests can enjoy the stunning, far-reaching views that surround it.

House On The Hill, Peak District

Reference 916619

Property reference 916619

The wonderful House On The Hill in the Peak District stunning rural views from each window but the star of the show really is this view from the dining area.

Reardon’s House, County Kerry

Reference 903994

Property reference 903994

Reardon’s House is the perfect base for exploring all that County Kerry has to offer before heading back to enjoy the wonderful, coastal views.

Sandy Shore, North York Moors and Coast

Reference 906727

Property reference 906727

Take in beautiful views of the sand and sea in the aptly named Sandy Shore, located in the delightful seaside town of Bridlington.

Solway Cottage, The Lake District

Reference 911744

Property reference 911744

Solway Cottage is the perfect property for a family getaway and provides the perfect view across the seafront from the decking area; perfect for an al fresco meal!

The Barn at Glanoer, Wales

Reference 22968

Property reference 22968

As if indulging in a claw foot bath tub with a glass of bubbly in hand wasn’t relaxing enough, imagine doing so whilst overlooking the view.

Telford House, Wales

Property reference 14628

Property reference 14628

This stunning Bangor property allows its guests to admire not only the Menai Straits but also the Menai Bridge.

Have you taken a photograph of a stunning view you encountered whilst at a Sykes Holiday Cottage? We’d love to see – please share it with us via Instagram, Twitter or Facebook. To see more lovely views, take a look at our Pinterest board.

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Leanne Dempsey

By Leanne Dempsey

A lover of reading, eating and shopping Leanne will often be found spending time with her two pugs or snapping away on instagram. A big fan of the city, She likes nothing more than getting away for a weekend break in the UK, her favourite places being London and Bath.

Geocaching Guide: Hunt for Treasure in the British Countryside

Monday, November 10th, 2014
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Geocaching involves searching for “caches” in the great outdoors using GPS. The activity is similar to the historic pastime of ‘letterboxing’ in the way participants must find hidden trinkets in the wilderness, however, geocachers must use a GPS receiver to help track down these items. It’s thought there are over two-million caches worldwide, with around eighty-thousand of those found in the UK.

Why not give geocaching a try yourself? It’s a great hobby that combines invigorating walks or cycle rides with the nostalgia and excitement of a treasure hunt; plus it’s a great activity to get the kids interested in the great outdoors. If you need more convincing, check out our guide to the best places to go geocaching in the UK below.

Dunwich Forest, Suffolk

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

It’s thought there are ten active geocaches hidden among the pine trees of Dunwich Forest, and though not difficult to find, the beauty of the woodland makes this a great place for beginners to track down a cache or two. On a bright day, the diffusion of sunlight through the trees is stunning, so be sure to take the camera.

Margam Country Park, South Wales

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

There are a small-offering of geocaches in Margam Country Park, and to find them all, you’ll need your walking boots! The caches are well spaced out, but if you’ve had a good breakfast and are feeling fit, it’s well worth spending the day tracking each of them down. Margam is a wonderful place to explore, with deer and other wildlife among the things you should keep an eye out for.

The Peak District, Derbyshire

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

The Peak District has proved it’s the number one spot for a wealth of outdoor pursuits, and it seems the national park can add geocaching to that list too. There are hundreds of caches here, and the rugged terrain poses a challenge for those trying to track them down. Whether atop lofty peaks or hidden in heathland, the cache quality here is excellent, with lots of genuine treasures to be found.

The Pennine Way Geocache Trail, Yorkshire Dales

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

Whether a keen novice or a seasoned pro, the Pennine Way Geocache Trail offers a challenge for any budding treasure-hunter. The trail features ten caches, placed at different points along the path, and cachers must find them in order to progress to the next. Due to its length, the trail will take two days to complete, though those up for a serious challenge could do it in a day.

Devon, South West

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

Thanks to its abundance of way-marked trails, bridle paths and cycle routes, Devon is a great place to switch on the GPS and go hunting. It’s thought there are over 25,000 geocaches in the county, many of which are hidden in the region’s prettiest pockets of countryside, including Dartmoor and the South West Coast Path. Wherever you choose to stay in the county, there’s bound to be some treasure nearby waiting to be uncovered!

Rent accommodation for a geocaching break with Sykes Cottages

Fancy yourself as a regular Indiana Jones or just want to get the little’uns out the house? Or, perhaps you need a good excuse to go for a walk? Then rent a cottage in the UK for a geocaching break. Many of our country cottages are available to rent in the UK’s finest geocaching hotspots, so grab the GPS and find yours today!

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Jonathan Tuplin

By Jonathan Tuplin

Jonathan is a lover of books, music and good food. Originally from Yorkshire, there's nothing he likes more than a cycle in the country. One of his favourite spots in the UK is Tenby, where he spent many a happy holiday as a child.

Sentinels of the Sea: 10 of Britain’s Finest Lighthouses

Friday, November 7th, 2014
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Before the pine trees grew tall beyond the garden the beam from Flamborough Lighthouse would fill my room. Carried seventeen miles over the Wolds, the light lit the curtains for a moment, and in a blink was gone.Anglesey Lighthouse shutterstock_118627255

Since then I’ve had a soft spot for a lighthouse. Perhaps it’s their hushed presence, their remoteness, or maybe their beauty. Whatever the reason, lighthouses are an undervalued landmark, and one that – as an island nation – we should be proud of.

Agree? Pay a visit to one of these lonely lighthouses on your next trip to the coast. Though some aren’t accessible, their scenic locations are great for a bracing walk. Plus, they could use some company.

Flamborough Lighthouse, East Riding of Yorkshire

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

Flamborough Head is home to two standing lighthouse towers, the earliest built in 1669. This lighthouse was never lit, but its successor – built in 1806 – guides vessels towards Bridlington and Scarborough to this day. The cliffs of Flamborough Head are home to thousands of nesting seabirds, and are of international importance for their geology. Coastal walks don’t get better.

Lizard Lighthouse, Cornwall

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

If ever a spit of land needed a lighthouse, it would be the Lizard. Pointing into the Atlantic, this beautiful Cornish peninsula would come as a nasty surprise to those who thought they’d dodged the Cornish coast. The Lizard Lighthouse wasn’t approved at first as authorities thought it would attract pirates to our shores.

Longstone Lighthouse, Farne Islands

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

Squally, rough and bleak: small wonder Longstone was built in 1826 to safeguard ships from the perilous Farne Islands. Sadly the lighthouse wasn’t enough to prevent Forfarshire running aground in 1838, with forty-two souls lost. In calm seas you can take a tour of the lighthouse, and you could see a grey seal or two.

Portland Bill Lighthouse, Dorset

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

Sit and doodle a lighthouse and you’d likely sketch Portland Bill, a magnificent red and white tower on the Isle of Portland. The Portland Bill was built in 1906, and is an important aid for ships navigating the treacherous English Channel. The lighthouse remains a popular visitor attraction, and its distinctive tower features on many a postcard.

Muckle Flugga Lighthouse, Shetland Islands

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

Located on the isle of Muckle Flugga, the Muckle Flugga Lighthouse is the most northerly lighthouse in the British Isles. It’s thought Robert Louis Stephenson took inspiration for ‘Treasure Island’ whilst visiting the lighthouse, and folklore tells the isle was created by two feuding giants. All we know is, the lighthouse is a sight to behold.

Start Point Lighthouse, Devon

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

Gothic ramparts make Start Point an imposing feature of the Devonshire shoreline. This white tower watches over an exposed promontory and requires two lights and a siren to warn ships of danger. Thanks to its location, Start Point is a wonderful rest-stop for walkers.

Southwold Lighthouse, Suffolk

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

The Southwold Lighthouse sits plumb in the middle of Southwold, a popular Suffolk resort. Towering over its surroundings, the lighthouse was built as a coastal marker for ships entering Southwold Harbour. If you’re in the area, it’ll be hard to miss this quirky lighthouse.

South Stack Lighthouse, Anglesey

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

South Stack could be the prettiest lighthouse in the country, and the most important. In 1859, 200 vessels were lost in the wake of a huge storm, with 800 lives lost. The lighthouse resides on its own island off the coast of Anglesey, accessed by 400 steps. Both the tower and its surroundings are well worth the effort, even when you’re climbing back up.

Dover Castle Lighthouse, Kent

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

You’ll find Britain’s oldest lighthouse within the imposing ramparts of Dover Castle. Built by the Romans in the first century, the Lighthouse – or the Pharos as it was known – was built to guide ships into the Roman port of Dubris. At 13 metres high, the lighthouse is the tallest Roman structure remaining on English soil.

St Catherine’s Lighthouse, Isle of Wight

Via Flickr

Via Flickr

Or the “The Cow and the Calf” as it’s known, is Britain’s most powerful lighthouse, with a beam range of up to thirty nautical miles. The lighthouse features an octagonal tower with a shorter tower attached holding the fog signal. A lighthouse has been stationed here since the 14th century, guiding thousands of ships safely through the Solent.

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Jonathan Tuplin

By Jonathan Tuplin

Jonathan is a lover of books, music and good food. Originally from Yorkshire, there's nothing he likes more than a cycle in the country. One of his favourite spots in the UK is Tenby, where he spent many a happy holiday as a child.

Five Of Britain’s Scariest Mythical Creatures

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014
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There are a few things we’re not short of here in Britain; coastline, forests and motorways are a few that spring to mind. With so much history and folklore, we’re also not short of a mythical creature or two! We’ve all heard of friendly pixies and elves, but what about the not-so-friendly creatures? In honour of Halloween, we’ve put together a short list of some of the scariest, creepiest and downright spooky mythical creatures that are sure to leave your blood curdled and your spine chilled.

Gwyllgi

Lonely Road

Image via Flickr

The Gwyllgi is a Welsh mythical creature also known as ‘The Dog of Darkness’. The Gwyllgi appears in the form of a large, black mastiff with red eyes and accounts of the creature suggest that it haunts lonely lanes and roads during twilight. Some have described the Gwyllgi as having the head of a man but the body of a large dog.

Nuckelavee

Image via Flickr

Image via Flickr

Nuckelavee is a horse-like demon that inhabited parts of Northern Scotland and lived in the sea, only coming on-land to feast on humans. When on-land the Nuckelavee rode a horse, however it was indistinguishable from its own body.

Screaming Skull

Screaming Skulls

Image via Flickr

Most counties in England have at least one tale of a skull which resides within a stately home or other ancient building and that causes storms, poltergeist activity and screams when it is removed from its position within the home. It is thought these screaming skulls are entrapped spirits although the origin of these spirits is often unknown.

The Bean Nighe

Image via Flickr

Image via Flickr

The Bean Nighe was a small washerwoman who always wore green and had webbed feet. She resided beside empty pools and streams, washing the blood-stained clothes of those about to ‘meet their maker’.

The Lantern Man

Lantern Man

Image via Flickr

A myth based in Norfolk, The Lantern Man is a visualisation of a man holding a lantern, who used the light to lure in travellers to his vicinity. He was believed to be dangerous and would attack anyone who came near him, however this belief varies throughout Britain.

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Leanne Dempsey

By Leanne Dempsey

A lover of reading, eating and shopping Leanne will often be found spending time with her two pugs or snapping away on instagram. A big fan of the city, She likes nothing more than getting away for a weekend break in the UK, her favourite places being London and Bath.