Archive for March, 2011

The Sykes Cottages Guide To Pickering

Thursday, March 31st, 2011
Pin It

Nestling in an enviable location between the Howardian Hills to the south and the North Yorks Moors National Park to the north, Pickering is an attractive market town, home to an ancient, ruined castle and to the longest steam railway in the country, the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. Many cottage holiday visitors come to the town for the railway, but there are plenty of other excellent attractions worth taking in. The spire of St. Peter and St. Paul’s parish church dominates Pickering; pay a visit inside to see the astonishingly colourful medieval frescoes, which still adorn the walls. Market day runs every Monday, and the local market, together with a good selection of shops and a wide range of places to eat make the countryside surrounding Pickering a good base for a North Yorkshire holiday cottage stay.
(more…)

Pin It

The Sykes Cottages Guide To Beaumaris

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011
Pin It

Just a short drive from the Britannia Bridge linking the island of Anglesey with the mainland, Beaumaris and the surrounding area make an excellent base for a holiday cottage stay. A pretty town, Beaumaris is dominated by a thirteenth-century castle, and on a clear day enjoys the stunning panorama of the Snowdonia mountain range as a backdrop. Many holidaymakers staying in an Anglesey cottage favour this easterly corner of the island as the location for their stay thanks to a combination of excellent beaches, such as Red Wharf Bay, in close proximity, a cluster of wet-weather attractions and, in the town itself, a plethora of pubs, restaurants and services.
(more…)

Pin It

The Sykes Cottages Guide To The Norfolk Broads (Part 2)

Wednesday, March 23rd, 2011
Pin It

Many visitors on a cottage holiday should explore South Walsham, east of Wroxham, in the heart of the Broads, where Fairhaven Woodland and Water Garden offers more than fifty acres of peaceful, watery haven and stunning blooms. Famed for its unique collection of primulas, birds, butterflies and flowers delight whatever the season and traditional woodland practices such as coppicing can be witnessed firsthand. Elsewhere among the Broads, there are some twenty or more individual Nature Reserves to choose from, each with its own unique offering. Some, such as Hoveton Great Broad, can only be reached on water; others, like the Broads Wildlife Centre at Ranworth, pride themselves on being totally free from boat traffic. Some of the larger reserves, such as those at Strumpshaw Fen and Breydon Water, come under the auspices of the RSPB. Barton and Hickling reserves qualify as Broads in their own right. Whilst all offer different species and specialities, be it insects or golden reedbeds, bitterns or plovers, grazing marshes, dykes or woodland walks, all offer a marvellous insight into the delicately balanced ecology of the region. One or two, however, are worthy of particular note. Hickling Broad, near the market town of Stalham, is one of the largest nature reserves, with an excellent Visitor Centre, bird hide, boardwalk trail, picnic area and gift shop. The Water Trail runs twice daily during the summer, offering visitors a guided boat trip to delve into otherwise hidden areas of the reserve, whilst the unique tree tower climbs some sixty feet high above the watery landscape, affording stunning panoramic views over the county’s northern and eastern coastlines. How Hill reserve, near Ludham, also offers exploration of the Broad by boat; the solar-powered ‘Electric Eel’ glides silently through the reedbeds of the dykes to reveal the varied and colourful marshland wildlife that proliferates in this reserve. Here you will also see the raw materials that are still used to thatch the roofs of many of Norfolk’s traditional cottages.
(more…)

Pin It

The Sykes Cottages Guide To The Norfolk Broads (Part 1)

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011
Pin It

The Norfolk Broads is a collection of rivers, lakes, nature reserves, marshes and bird sanctuaries in the eastern part of East Anglia, and a phenomenon that is largely of man’s own creation. The digging of peat to provide fuel was a major industry for more than two centuries in the middle ages, but over-digging eventually led to water seeping through and swamping the low-lying land. Nowadays, many people choose to discover the unique, tranquil charm of this region by boat, but there are plenty of interesting towns and villages in the Broads area, and those choosing a holiday cottage stay locally can still enjoy the miles of unspoilt, lock-free waterways, as many barges and boats can be rented by the day or the afternoon. The scenery changes little throughout the region, but the ecology of the area is unique, and for a slow pace of life and ‘get away from it all’ sensation, the Broads is a captivating part of the country.
(more…)

Pin It

The Sykes Cottages Guide to Richmond

Friday, March 18th, 2011
Pin It

Many visitors on a cottage holiday visit the beautiful market town of Richmond. Set on the fast-flowing river Swale amid stunning Dales countryside, the town is both dominated and defined by its impressive Norman castle and remains a relatively undiscovered gem. Close to Catterick Garrison, one the of British Army’s most important bases, there are plenty of shops and services, and visitors will find it an excellent base for a holiday cottage for discovering the North York Moors national park and the Yorkshire Dales.

(more…)

Pin It