Archive for June, 2011

The Sykes Cottages Guide To Cheddar And The Cheddar Gorge

Thursday, June 16th, 2011
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On a cottage holiday, Cheddar is an ideal place to visit. Between Bath and Glastonbury, the picturesque Somerset village of Cheddar has gained fame over the years from production of the eponymously named cheese, and a stunning set of caves and fissures running into the Mendip hills known as the Cheddar Gorge. Those enjoying a holiday home stay in the Cheddar area are well placed for visiting both the attractions local to Cheddar, and those of the wider Somerset area.
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The Sykes Cottages Guide To Bishops Castle

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011
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Bishops Castle is a delightful place to visit whilst staying in a holiday cottage. Rather like neighbouring Church Stretton, delightful Bishops Castle will appeal to lovers of real ale. The town has not one but two award-winning microbreweries, offering tours and tastings, and also offers an official welcome to walkers through the ‘Walkers are Welcome’ scheme. A visit to the town always involves a hike of sorts; the main street is a dizzying one in six slope; fortunately there are tea rooms and coffee shops at the ‘top of the town’ to provide refreshment.

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The Sykes Cottages Guide To Settle

Monday, June 13th, 2011
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A charming market centre at the heart of Ribblesdale, Settle makes an excellent base for those looking for a relaxing Yorkshire Dales holiday cottage break. Famous as the starting point for one of the most scenic rail routes in the country, the 72-mile Settle to Carlisle railway, the village is a bustling market town in the midst of astonishingly beautiful countryside.
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The Sykes Cottages Guide To Craster And Dunstanburgh Castle

Thursday, June 9th, 2011
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The village of Craster is an ideal destination for a cottage holiday. A small fishing village with a pretty, nineteenth-century harbour on the Northumbrian coast and within the designated Northumbria Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Craster is today best known for both the internationally-renowned Craster kipper and as the starting point for the picturesque coastal path that winds along the basaltic cliffs to the dramatic ruins of Dunstanburgh Castle, one of Northumbria’s most popular visitor attractions. Making the most of the local catch, brought in on ‘cobles’, or traditional fishing boats, the Robson family have been preparing kippers, cod and smoked salmon in the traditional, oak-smoked way and exporting them around the UK and Europe since 1856. The curing sheds or smokehouses are as much a part of the local village landscape as the more famous nearby landmark, Dunstanburgh Castle.
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The Sykes Cottages Guide To Blaenau Ffestiniog

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011
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With an astonishingly monotone, grey landscape, thanks to both the wet climate and the vast slate mines which once formed the very heart of the Welsh slate mining industry, at first glance Blaenau Ffestiniog is an unlikely tourist draw, despite sitting high at the heart of the Snowdonia National Park. Nonetheless its dogged re-invention since the demise of the slate mining industry means that it does have a number of attractions to those visiting the National Park. The most famous of these is undoubtedly the Ffestiniog Railway which connects the inland mining town with Porthmadog some fifteen or so miles away on the coast, and which was instrumental in transporting vast quantities of slate from Blaenau Ffestiniog’s huge quarries to the ships waiting at sea.
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