When The Weather In Scotland Improves …

Pin It

… Why not book yourself a holiday cottage in Campbeltown? As you can see from the guide below, it really is a fascinating place to visit with lots to see and do.

Nestling under a range of hills and sheltered by a loch, Campbeltown’s somewhat isolated position nonetheless makes it an excellent base for discovering the scenic Kintyre peninsula. Once a thriving centre for shipbuilding and whisky production, the latter at least is undergoing something of a revival, and visitors should take a tour of the Springbank Distillery. As Scottish distilleries go, this one is unique in that the entire production process, from barley to bottling, takes place on site. Tours provide insight into the history, so inextricably linked with that of the town itself, as well as tasting and the opportunity to purchase the three distinctive single malts in production here. The town’s Heritage Centre provides an eclectic collection of exhibits and in depths look at the history not only of the town, but also the wider Kintyre area. In terms of shops, services and places to eat, Campbeltown has plenty to offer, including two small supermarkets, as well as the quaintly-named ‘Wee Picture House’ cinema, one of the oldest in Scotland, and well worth a visit for the building and experience alone!

Campeltown makes an excellent starting point for discovering southern Kintyre, and one of the easiest ways to do this is by boat. From the harbour, regular wildlife watching boat trips run in season to the Mull of Kintyre, and Ailsa Craig and Sanda islands. If your sea legs desert you, then visit instead Davaar Island, just out from Campeltown harbour and accessible on foot at appropriate tide times. Most visitors go to enjoy the natural surroundings and visit the work of a local artist from the turn of the nineteenth century, depicting the Crucifixion of Christ in a cave painting. For other day trips, Southend lies some eight miles or so at the southern end of the peninsula, with its relics linked to the story of St Columba, such as the chapel and footprints, who is thought to have first landed here from Ireland, which is only miles across the water and which is clearly visible on fine days. Dunaverty Bay is close by and has a lovely, sandy beach.

Onwards from Southend lies the Mull of Kintyre, along a long stretch of winding, single-track road through scenery so inspirational that the name has long been immortalised in song by Sir Paul McCartney. Golfers will need no introduction to the stunning links course at nearby Machrihanish, which was recently given the honour of having the ‘best first hole in the world’ by leading PGA golfers, and this course and many others on the peninsula means this location is ideal for golfers. While nature is visible scarcely without effort, whether this is eagles, seabirds or osprey, the Scottish Owl Sanctuary, at walking distance from town, makes a good visit for those holidaying with small children during the April-October season.

To see our choice of holiday cottages in the places described above, please click here.

Nestling under a range of hills and sheltered by a loch, Campbeltown’s somewhat isolated position nonetheless makes it an excellent base for discovering the scenic Kintyre peninsula. Once a thriving centre for shipbuilding and whisky production, the latter at least is undergoing something of a revival, and visitors should take a tour of the Springbank Distillery. As Scottish distilleries go, this one is unique in that the entire production process, from barley to bottling, takes place on site. Tours provide insight into the history, so inextricably linked with that of the town itself, as well as tasting and the opportunity to purchase the three distinctive single malts in production here. The town’s Heritage Centre provides an eclectic collection of exhibits and in depths look at the history not only of the town, but also the wider Kintyre area. In terms of shops, services and places to eat, Campbeltown has plenty to offer, including two small supermarkets, as well as the quaintly-named ‘Wee Picture House’ cinema, one of the oldest in Scotland, and well worth a visit for the building and experience alone!

Campeltown makes an excellent starting point for discovering southern Kintyre, and one of the easiest ways to do this is by boat. From the harbour, regular wildlife watching boat trips run in season to the Mull of Kintyre, and Ailsa Craig and Sanda islands. If your sea legs desert you, then visit instead Davaar Island, just out from Campeltown harbour and accessible on foot at appropriate tide times. Most visitors go to enjoy the natural surroundings and visit the work of a local artist from the turn of the nineteenth century, depicting the Crucifixion of Christ in a cave painting. For other day trips, Southend lies some eight miles or so at the southern end of the peninsula, with its relics linked to the story of St Columba, such as the chapel and footprints, who is thought to have first landed here from Ireland, which is only miles across the water and which is clearly visible on fine days. Dunaverty Bay is close by and has a lovely, sandy beach. Onwards from Southend lies the Mull of Kintyre, along a long stretch of winding, single-track road through scenery so inspirational that the name has long been immortalised in song by Sir Paul McCartney. Golfers will need no introduction to the stunning links course at nearby Machrihanish, which was recently given the honour of having the ‘best first hole in the world’ by leading PGA golfers, and this course and many others on the peninsula means this location is ideal for golfers. While nature is visible scarcely without effort, whether this is eagles, seabirds or osprey, the Scottish Owl Sanctuary, at walking distance from town, makes a good visit for those holidaying with small children during the April-October season.

Pin It

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.