Greenacre Cottage

Eskdalemuir near Langholm, Scotland (Ref. 22615)

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  • Greenacre Cottage photo 1

Cottage features

  • Off road parking
  • Ground floor accommodation
  • Ground floor bedroom
  • Open fire
  • Smoke-free
  • Garden / Patio
  • Cot available
  • Highchair available
  • Washing machine
  • Dishwasher
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  • Rating


  • Sleeps


  • Bedrooms


  • Bathrooms


  • Pets


The property

Langholm 13 miles.

A delightful, former shepherd's cottage on a sheep farm in attractive countryside, thirteen miles north of Langholm in beautiful Dumfriesshire.

All ground floor and refurbished to a high standard throughout, this Langholm cottage boasts two bedrooms which can be converted to doubles or twins on request.

The fitted kitchen of this Langholm cottage leads into a cosy dining room, the ideal place to relax over a meal and discuss the day's events.

The stylishly decorated sitting room benefits from a woodburning stove, and looks out over the sheep meadow to the hills beyond.

To the rear of this Langholm cottage is a garage which can be used to store bikes, plus the picnic bench to the side allows you to sit and plan the day's activities whilst being surrounded by nature.

With walking, cycling and fishing virtually from your doorstep, this Eskdale self-catering holiday home is the ideal base for exploring this beautiful part of the country.

The bustling towns of Langholm and Lockerbie are both a short drive to the south and with many shops, cafes and historical sites, there is something for everyone at this charming Eskdale cottage.


All ground floor. Two double bedrooms (zip/link, can be twin on request). Bathroom with bath, shower over, basin and WC. Kitchen. Dining room. Sitting room with woodburning stove.


Oil central heating with woodburning stove. Electric oven and hob, microwave, fridge/freezer, washing machine, dishwasher, TV with Freeview, DVD, CD, iPod dock, selection of books and DVDs. Fuel power and starter pack for stove inc. in rent. Bed linen and towels inc. in rent. Cot and highchair on request. Ample off road parking. Lockable bike storage in garage. Lawned area with furniture. Sorry, no pets and no smoking. Shop and pub 13 miles.

This property offers the following short breaks:

  • Winter
  • Off-season
  • Last minute
  • Christmas

Guest Reviews


    • “This cottage was a prefect for my family just to get away and have a chilled weekend to relax in a lovely comfortable cottage. We really enjoyed discovering prehistoric trails that were located near to the cottage. My 7 year old son said it was the best holiday he ever had as he loved just playing out in the garden even though it was raining.”

    Mrs Adams, Frizington, October 2014

    • “A lovely Cottage in peaceful surroundings. Was well furnished.”

    Mrs Witten, Nottingham, July 2014

    • “The location was beautiful and the accommodation fantastic - everything had been thought of and the cottage was very comfortable. The estate staff were particularly friendly and helpful and went out of their way to make us feel welcome.”

    Ms Palmer, Letchworth Garden City, June 2014

Show all Sykes Cottages Reviews

About the location


Lockerbie 18 miles; Carlisle 19 miles; Hawick 23 miles.

Langholm is a burgh on the River Esk in Dumfries and Galloway. From Mesolithic Man 9000 years ago, through Roman occupation to the notorious Border Reivers around the 16th century, Langholm has much history to share. The town developed around the textile industry, achieving a worldwide reputation for its woollens, expanding its population and earning the nickname of the ‘Muckle Toon’, or the Large Town. Langholm is also famous as the birthplace of Hugh MacDiarmid, the poet and Thomas Telford who was born just outside the town and after whom a road in the town is named. An unused Episcopalian church was converted into the Armstrong clan museum and was visited by astronaut Neil Armstrong in 1972 when he was made a freeman of the burgh. The town also hosts festivals for music, food and arts and the annual Common Riding draws many visitors.