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Gin may have first been made in Holland, but it will always be associated with Britain.

For four centuries, the UK’s distillers have experimented with creating the perfect flavours. Today, gin is more popular than ever—and new variations hit the market all the time. It can be a bit bewildering to know where to start, but if you’re serious about your gin drinking then you can find a way.

Check out the company called Two Birds Spirits, for example, who set up shop in Market Harborough, Leicestershire, as recently as 2013. They use a combination of traditional materials, modern techniques, and secret ingredients to make batches of just 100 bottles at a time. They’re already a hit with the experts, so you’ll need to snap a bottle up fast.

A more classical version can be tried with Plymouth Gin. This sweeter alternative to London Gin has been produced since 1793 and can only be made in Plymouth, Devon— making it a favourite among sailors!

Our new infographic provides a thorough guide to the most exciting gins available on the British market. Wherever you are in the country, you’ll find a distiller near to you—and you can always make an online order for something further afield if a tipple tickles your fancy.



Gin is more than a drink — it’s a way of life. So let’s raise a glass to that glorious stuff!

Looking for accommodation that’s as delicious as all this juniper-filled joy? Whatever you’re after, our handpicked cottages across the UK & Ireland are a cool glass of holiday goodness that everyone will love.


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Sources
Gin Foundry (2013). Two Birds. ginfoundry.com
Sipsmith (2013). The History of Gin: London Dry, Plymouth, and Old Tom. sipsmith.com

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