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From lakes, fells and waterfalls, to mountains, pastures and woodland, the Lake District is full of natural wonders visited by millions each year.

Many are seeking to challenge themselves on this incredible region’s range of walks, ambles and scrambles; whether it’s scaling the highest point in England, to enjoying sweeping vistas over Keswick, there is something to suit all abilities in this round up.

Read on to discover 7 of the best mountains and fells to visit during your stay…


1. Scafell Pike

scafell pike

Starting off with the highest mountain in England, Scafell Pike is a very popular walk and is part of the famous Three Peaks Challenge. The summit can be accessed via several different locations, but our pick is the Corridor route – beginning at Seathwaite in the Borrowdale valley, you can park up on any spaces on the road up to the farm at Seathwaite, and set off up this fairly easy walk.

Distance: 14 km
Ascent: 860 m +/-
Duration: 6/7 hours
Difficulty: Grade 1 Scramble/Moderate walk
More information: www.ukscrambles.com


2. Helvellyn via Striding Edge and Swirral Edge

striding edge lake district

Located just north of Ambleside is Helvellyn, for a route with easy but exposed scrambling to experience far-reaching views over the Lake District at the summit. As long as you’re equipped with a good head for heights and mountain walking experience, you’ll enjoy finding your way across these incredible edges.

Distance: 12.4 km
Ascent: 820 m +/-
Duration: 5/6 hours
Difficulty:
Grade 1 Scramble/Strenuous walk
More information: www.golakes.co.uk


3. Haystacks

Haystacks, Lake District

Although not the tallest peak, Haystacks was a favourite of the man who brought popularity to the Lake District with his seven-volume Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells, Alfred Wainwright. He requested that his ashes were scattered at Innominate Tarn near the summit.

This peak is a short climb from the south-eastern end of Buttermere Valley with the option of making it a little longer by taking a walk around the shores of Buttermere.

Distance: 12.5 km
Ascent: 553 m+/-
Duration: 3/4 hours
Difficulty: Medium/hard walk
More information: www.golakes.co.uk


4. Pillar from Wasdale Head

wasdale

Boasting awe-inspiring views on a clear day, Pillar summit can be reached via a classic walk beginning from Wasdale involving an ascent of over 800m.  The route will take you up through the Mosedale valley, crossing Gatherstone Beck and up to the top of Black Sail Pass before continuing to the summit. Views at the top can reach as far as Scotland, the Isle of Man and the Lakeland Fells.

Distance: 12 km
Ascent: 879 m+/-
Duration: 4/5 hours
Difficulty:
Medium/hard walk
More information: www.nationaltrust.org.uk


5. Great Crag and Grange Fell

rosthwaite

Combining two Wainwright Fells to tick of your list, this walk begins in Rosthwaite and has a steep ascent that provides you with something different by taking you through gorgeous woodland, before opening out again to beautiful scenery. This route doesn’t reach the same heights as some of the others, but it makes up for it in diverse terrain and rugged landscapes.

Distance: 8.3 km
Ascent: 477 m+/-
Duration: 3/4 hours
Difficulty: 
Medium walk
More information: www.walkingenglishman.com


6. Catbells

catbells view keswick lakes

A short, sharp and exciting climb can be had up to the summit of Catbells, overlooking Derwent Water and enjoying vistas over Keswick. The popularity of this route means it’s best to start early or set off later for an evening walk if you’re someone who prefers to walk in relative peace and quiet. Park up near the foot of the fell near to Hawse End and begin this ascent.

Distance: 9 km
Ascent: 460 m+/-
Duration: 40 – 50 minutes 
Difficulty:
Easy/medium walk
More information: www.andrewswalks.co.uk


7. Great Gable via Moses’ Trod

great gable mountain lakes

Forming a circular route ascending via the easy to follow Moses’ Trod and coming down via Green Gable and Brandreth, the route up England’s 4th highest mountain, Great Gable. This walk begins from Honister Slate Mines, with the route taking its name from a quarryman, Moses Rigg,  who devised the shortest route to carry the slate to the port, as well as his own illegally distilled whisky which he would sell on his travels!

Distance: 9.6 km
Ascent: 679 m+/-
Duration: 5/6 hours 
Difficulty:
Medium walk
More information: www.golakes.co.uk


When choosing your holiday cottage in the Lake District, pick from our wide range of excellent accommodation, as with our years of experience and knowledge you are sure to find the perfect property for you and your loved ones with us. 

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